Kumu nui - The great source. The point of origin. The true foundation.

It is also the favorite name of the coconut tree. Resources from the coconut tree were used for food and drink, oils, fuels, the weaving of mats, baskets, and traps. So plentiful were the gifts of the coconut tree it was called kumu nui. The great source.

Kumu nui also refers to the shape of the coconut tree; enlarged and round at its base. A Hawaiian proverb “I ola nā lālā no ke kumu” says “the leaves live because of the trunk,” referring to the importance of foundation.

Another Hawaiian proverb (ōlelo noʻeau) “nānā i ke kumu” says “look to the source,” which means to pay attention and be present with our life. Open ourselves to learning and receive knowledge. It encourages us to find authenticity in our being, to have gratitude for our foundation, and to seek more.

Kumu means source. Also referring to a teacher or mentor. Our source of knowledge. Knowledge is of great value, shaping our way of being, and in turn shaping our experience. Nui means great, grand, first, or substantial.

If we feel lack it is because we have made the base of our trunk small, and closed ourselves. By opening ourselves to our source we will receive abundance. Abundant harmony, health, love, friendship, adventure, and knowledge.

Nānā i ke kumu, look to the source.
Thibert Lussiaa
Max Yarawamai
Mike Field
Raimana Van Bastolaer
Kevin Nakamaru
Mark Healey
Archie Kalepa
We create once-in-a-lifetime travel experiences rooted in adventure and exploration, guided by world-class outdoorsmen.

Contact Us
Kumu nui - The great source. The point of origin. The true foundation.

It is also the favorite name of the coconut tree. Resources from the coconut tree were used for food and drink, oils, fuels, the weaving of mats, baskets, and traps. So plentiful were the gifts of the coconut tree it was called kumu nui. The great source.

Kumu nui also refers to the shape of the coconut tree; enlarged and round at its base. A Hawaiian proverb “I ola nā lālā no ke kumu” says “the leaves live because of the trunk,” referring to the importance of foundation.

Another Hawaiian proverb (ōlelo noʻeau) “nānā i ke kumu” says “look to the source,” which means to pay attention and be present with our life. Open ourselves to learning and receive knowledge. It encourages us to find authenticity in our being, to have gratitude for our foundation, and to seek more.

Kumu means source. Also referring to a teacher or mentor. Our source of knowledge. Knowledge is of great value, shaping our way of being, and in turn shaping our experience. Nui means great, grand, first, or substantial.

If we feel lack it is because we have made the base of our trunk small, and closed ourselves. By opening ourselves to our source we will receive abundance. Abundant harmony, health, love, friendship, adventure, and knowledge.

Nānā i ke kumu, look to the source.
Thibert Lussiaa
Max Yarawamai
Mike Field
Raimana Van Bastolaer
Kevin Nakamaru
Mark Healey
Archie Kalepa
We create once-in-a-lifetime travel experiences rooted in adventure and exploration, guided by world-class outdoorsmen.

Contact Us

Thibert Lussiaa

Thibert spent his childhood in Tahiti, where he discovered his passion for the ocean. Recognized as one of the top paddlers in the world, Thibert has competed and emerged victorious in the sport’s premier canoe paddling races, from dominating the Liberty World Challenge in New York to earning victory in the famous 41-mile Molokaʻi Hoe Canoe Race. As a coach, Thibert has inspired champion paddlers at Keauhou Canoe Club and Team Red Bull Waʻa, and he co-founded the elite Team Livestrong crew. More recently Thibert served as a co-coach for the Kai ʻOpua Canoe Club men’s program and hosts the world’s largest long-distance canoe race, the Queen Liliʻuokalani Canoe Race. Thibert currently lives on the island of Hawaiʻi.

Max Yarawamai

Max Yarawamai grew up fishing by canoe in the blue lagoons of remote Ulitihi, Micronesia. Born a chief’s son, he learned the art of navigating from atoll to atoll from his father, who was functionally blind. At the age of 13, Max’s life was transformed when he moved to Hawaiʻi to attend the prestigious Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy. In 1980, Max met the legendary Mau Piailug — the master navigator who taught Hawaiians to re-learn the traditional science of non-instrument, trans-Pacific voyaging. Hailing from the neighboring atoll of Satowal, Piailug adopted the young Micronesian as his right-hand man in Hawaiʻi, launching Max’s trajectory as a master at sighting islands on the horizon.

Mike Field

When Mike Field pictures the slopes of his home mountain Hualalai, it’s always from the perspective of being out on the open ocean, stand-up paddling along the Kona coast. It’s a view and appreciation reflected in his world-renowned artwork, which captures the simplicity and beauty of the Pacific, seen in collaborations with the late surf brand Quiksilver. Born in Guam and raised in Hawaiʻi, Mike finds inspiration in years spent surfing, paddling, and sailing his canoe, drawing lessons from light and dynamism and mastering the dual arts of work and play. Today, Mike lives in Holualoa, Hawaiʻi, with his wife and two children.

Raimana Van Bastolaer

When the world’s best surfers hope to find themselves deep in the epically heavy barrel of Teahupoʻo, Tahiti, it’s Raimana’s judgment that they trust. Representing the truth of his home break and Tahitian culture is a calling that Raimana has ridden to renown, hosting surf pros like Kelly Slater, Laird Hamilton, and John John Florence. “It’s not just the waves, it’s not just the surfing,” Raimana, in his French-accented mirth, told Surfer Magazine in 2015. “People can go find waves all over, cold, warm, crowded, empty, whatever. But how we host people, and show them a real Tahitian time, that’s why people come here.”

Kevin Nakamaru

Kevin Nakamaru was born and raised in Kona, Hawaii, where he grew up with a passion for fishing and hunting. Kevin's fishing journey has taken him around the world, and his constant dedication to learning has set the stage for his renowned skills, setting numerous records, including over twenty billfish and tuna world records and multiple tournament wins. A seasoned hunter and guide on land, Kevin most notably is one of only a handful of fishermen to accomplish the Triple Crown of Granders - to catch three thousand-pound billfish of different species - and the only one to do it twice.

Archie Kalepa

Among the legendary watermen of Oceania, Archie Kalepa is a pioneer. Known for his daredevil accomplishments and crediting senses sharpened by skills passed down from his Hawaiian ancestors, Archie was the first man to solo stand-up paddle across the Molokai Channel, the first to paddle down the Colorado River and one of the first tow-in surfers to challenge the 70-foot waves at “Jaws” at Peʻahi, Maui. Since his first voyage with the Polynesian Voyaging Society in 1992, Kalepa has sailed the world aboard Hōkūleʻa, including legs to Rapa Nui, the Galapagos, Virginia, and South Africa, on the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage. As a lifeguard for Maui County, Kalepa was inducted into the Hawaiian Waterman Hall of Fame and was awarded the Eddie Aikau Waterman Award for developing new water rescue techniques.

Mark Healey

Mark Healey learned to surf as a three-year-old at Subset Beach, earned his first sponsorship at 13 years old, rode a 30-foot wave at Waimea Bay at age 14, and turned pro at 17. It was just the start of an increasingly frenetic love affair with the ocean and a career as a big-wave surfer, award-winning spear-fisherman, free-diver, photographer, filmmaker, and part-time Hollywood stuntman. “If there’s a giant storm heading for Europe and there’s going to be some huge surf, I’ll get on a plane and be there in a day,” Mark said. “The ocean and the wind are the only things that dictate how and where I spend my time.”

A champion freediver and winner of the 2008 Spearfishing World Cup, Mark uses his impressive ability to hold his breath underwater for six minutes to assist research scientists in tagging Hammerheads and Pelagic Thresher sharks. It’s a part of Mark’s mission to deepen the broader culture’s relationship with the ocean. “I absolutely believe that people will only protect something if they value it, and it’s my life’s mission to inspire others to value the ocean the way I do.”